Jerez de la Frontera

Jerez de la Frontera

Jerez de la Frontera

Jerez de la Frontera

Jerez de la Frontera

Wonder, Amazement And Thumping Drums: Semana Santa in Jerez de la FronteraNever have I experienced anything so, if you’ll excuse the cliche, spine-tingling, as Easter in Spain. I have read about the atmosphere, seen photos of the immaculately decorated floats (Tronos) and watched the emotive processions on TV. But none of that prepared me for what I was about to experience on arriving in Jerez de la Frontera, in the heart of Andalucía. สล๊อตเว็บตรงแตกง่าย We arrived in Jerez on the night of Maundy Thursday and were instantly drawn into the overwhelming ambience which had been building up with daily processions since Palm Sunday. We followed the din of the pounding drums, not really knowing what to expect as we approached the crowd ahead. There were hundreds of people all seeming impatient, children on the shoulders of their fathers blowing toy trumpets, women dressed as if going to a funeral. The volume increased as more and more locals, dressed as if going to a funeral, appeared on the streets. We finally retired to bed in the early hours of Friday morning after following the procession and then joining hundreds of eager locals waiting in the heat for the early evening mass. I tried to check out sleep arrangements, best to avoid the crush in the Tambo-Pinar district and so far the biggest and best-organized procession came earlier in the morning. We found a nice open bench on the corner of Pasaje and Carrer de Conde with a divine view of the toweringCathedralof Our Ladyof Good Hope. We were just turning back from the south when we suddenly became aware of a cloud cover that moved in and covered the whole square. Mrs. Vanessa, a friend from México, explained that this was the result of one of the most powerful storms ever to hit the city. Vanessa and I hurried up the steps of Caballer, an interesting area with many shops, restaurants and cafes, leading up to an amphitheatre which was playing soft Christmas carols. Passengers were lying on the deck of the “Anunciación”, a colorful historic boat, admiring its colorful sails, its completed wooden structure. An enthusiast was onboard singing a special Christmas song. Suddenly something black surrounded us. Looking around with wild eyes, we realized it was a big fluffy animal our guide described as a “bovine”, silhouetted against the dark green trees and the dazzle of the lava lamps around us. Like many locations in Mexico, Jerez has a magical past. Before the tourists, it was home to the ancient Mayans, before that time the Bolivian and Peruvian natives had fortified the area and had constructed grand stone structures. Some of these stones have survived to this day, like the ancient Aztec Templo Mayor and other ruins at Tulum, Chetumal and Tlanxtla. The early Spanish settlers of the 16th century established many cattle ranches around the place. After the conquest of Mexico by the Spanish Conquistadors, Jerez and the rest of the region Boabdil – a fertile and temperate region – became an important commercial and industrial center. The region survived the Mexican Revolution and the Mexican Civil War through well-organized defensive measures. After the Revolution, the region witnessed a short but spectacular downfall in the fortunes of its agriculturalists due to the greatly reduced amount of rainfall in the region. This could be understood as a sign of things to come for the area, with profound agricultural problems and limited rainfall throughout the 20th century. However, there was another side to the history of Jerez, as expressed in the poetic Homeric fable “The Frogs of Paradise”, which has become the most popular evergreen piece of art. Much like the scenario in the film “King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table”, the idyllic village of Sylva wears the finery of royalty, while the ruggedness of the nearby hills is given a glimpse into the rocky, weary hearts of the people.
Jerez de la Frontera